Posts Tagged ‘Stratford upon Avon’

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CFP Shakespeare BritGrad 2015

January 21, 2015

britgrad_black4-6 June 2015

The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

“We invite graduate students with interests in Shakespeare, Renaissance, and Early Modern Studies to join us in June for the Seventeenth Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference.

This interdisciplinary conference, celebrating its seventeenth anniversary in 2015, provides a friendly and stimulating academic forum in which graduate students from all over the world can present their research on Shakespeare, the Early Modern period, or the Renaissance. In accordance with the Shakespeare Institute’s emerging reputation as a place for creative criticism, we also encourage creative responses.  The conference takes place in an active centre of Shakespeare and Early Modern scholarship in Shakespeare’s home town, Stratford-upon-Avon. Undergraduate students in their final two years of study are also invited to attend the conference as auditors.

Plenary speakers include Chris Laoutaris (University of Birmingham), Laurie Maguire (University of Oxford), and Andy Kesson (University of Roehampton). See our blog for information on plenary speakers as they are confirmed. Delegates will also have the opportunity to attend the RSC production of Othello, directed by Iqbal Khan (Much Ado ’12), and starring Hugh Quarshie (Faust, Julius Caesar ’96) and Lucian Msamati (Pericles ’06) at a group-booking price. Lunch will be provided on each day, and we will be hosting a party and a reception for the delegates.

We invite abstracts of up to 200 words for papers twenty minutes in length on subjects relating to Shakespeare, Early Modern, and/or Renaissance studies. More creative forms of criticism, including original writing, may be submitted, also requiring a 200 word abstract.  We welcome papers from a wide variety of disciplines, from literature to art history and beyond.  Delegates wishing to give papers must register by 23 April 2015.  (Abstracts cannot be considered until the delegate has registered.)  Auditors are encouraged to register by 21 May 2015 for early-bird pricing. Due to the growing success of this annual conference, we strongly encourage early registration to ensure a place on the conference programme.

For more information, find us on Facebook, on Twitter, and at britgrad.wordpress.com, or email britgrad.conference@gmail.com.

[Download this CFP here.]”

Call for Papers.

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Richard Wilson Lecture: Shakespeare’s Olympic Game

August 10, 2012

Professor Richard Wilson (Cardiff University) will give a plenary lecture today at the International Shakespeare Conference in Stratford-upon-Avon. The title of his talk is

‘Like an Olympian Wrestling: Shakespeare’s Olympic Game’

Find out more here.

You can now hear Richard Wilson’s talk here:

http://iscstratford2012.wordpress.com/2012/08/10/richard-wilson/

Follow @CardiffShakes

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Shakespeare’s Shrine: The Bard’s Birthplace and the Invention of Stratford-upon-Avon

June 28, 2012

An exciting book by Dr Julia Thomas (Director of CEIR at Cardiff University) has recently been published by the University of Pennsylvania Press:

“Anyone who has paid the entry fee to visit Shakespeare’s Birthplace on Henley Street in Stratford-upon-Avon—and there are some 700,000 a year who do so—might be forgiven for taking the authenticity of the building for granted. The house, as the official guidebooks state, was purchased by Shakespeare’s father, John Shakespeare, in two stages in 1556 and 1575, and William was born and brought up there. The street itself might have changed through the centuries—it is now largely populated by gift and tea shops—but it is easy to imagine little Will playing in the garden of this ancient structure, sitting in the inglenook in the kitchen, or reaching up to turn the Gothic handles on the weathered doors.

In Shakespeare’s Shrine Julia Thomas reveals just how fully the Birthplace that we visit today is a creation of the nineteenth century. Two hundred years after Shakespeare’s death, the run-down house on Henley Street was home to a butcher shop and a pub. Saved from the threat of an ignominious sale to P. T. Barnum, it was purchased for the English nation in 1847 and given the picturesque half-timbered façade first seen in a fanciful 1769 engraving of the building. A perfect confluence of nationalism, nostalgia, and the easy access afforded by rail travel turned the house in which the Bard first drew breath into a major tourist attraction, one artifact in a sea of Shakespeare handkerchiefs, eggcups, and door-knockers.

It was clear to Victorians on pilgrimage to Stratford just who Shakespeare was, how he lived, and to whom he belonged, Thomas writes, and the answers were inseparable from Victorian notions of class, domesticity, and national identity. In Shakespeare’s Shrine she has written a richly documented and witty account of how both the Bard and the Warwickshire market town of his birth were turned into enduring symbols of British heritage—and of just how closely contemporary visitors to Stratford are following in the footsteps of their Victorian predecessors.”

Visit the publisher’s webpage for the book here

Read the first pages of the book on amazon.com

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BritGrad Shakespeare Conference 2012

January 30, 2012

This just in:

“We invite graduate students with interests in both Shakespeare and Renaissance studies to join us in June for the Fourteenth Annual British Graduate Conference.

The interdisciplinary conference provides a friendly but stimulating academic forum in which graduate students from all over the world can present their research and meet together in an active centre of Shakespeare research: Shakespeare’s home town of Stratford-upon-Avon. Undergraduate students in their final two years of study are also invited to attend the conference as auditors.

The conference will feature talks by Peter Holland (Notre Dame), Tiffany Stern (Oxford), Paul Menzer (Mary Baldwin), and Katherine Duncan-Jones (Oxford). Delegates also have the opportunity to attend the Royal Shakespeare Company’s production of Richard III, part of the World Shakespeare Festival, at a group-booking price. Lunch will be provided on each day, and we will be hosting a dance and a drinks reception for the delegates.

We invite abstracts of approximately 200 words for papers twenty minutes in length (3,000 words or less) on subjects relating to Shakespeare and Renaissance studies. Delegates wishing to give papers must register by Friday May 4, 2012. Due to the growing success of this annual conference, we strongly encourage early registration to ensure a place on the conference programme.”

Find out more here:

www.britgrad.wordpress.com

 

 

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Shakespeare Dig Stratford: BBC One

August 23, 2011

National Treasures Live

BBC One: Wednesday 19:30, 24th August 2011

Live from Stratford Upon Avon, Dan Snow and Sian Williams continue their series celebrating the best in British history. In this programme, they investigate claims that William Shakespeare may not have been the author of the classic plays, and join an excavation at the house where he died.

 

Find out more here

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A ‘real Ophelia’ for Shakespeare?

June 8, 2011

BBC NEWS:

An Oxford historian has found evidence of a story that could be the real-life inspiration for Shakespeare’s tragic character, Ophelia. Dr Steven Gunn has found a coroner’s report into the drowning of a Jane Shaxspere in 1569. The girl, possibly a young cousin of William Shakespeare, had been picking flowers when she fell into a millpond near Stratford upon Avon.

‘Local tragedy’

“It was quite a surprise to find Jane Shaxspere’s entry in the coroners’ reports – it might just be a coincidence, but the links to Ophelia are certainly tantalising,” he said.

The coroners’ report, originally written in Latin, describes the death of two-and-half-year-old Jane Shaxspere, who drowned picking marigolds in a stream beside a millpond.

The translation of the report records the cause, time and place. “By reason of collecting and holding out certain flowers called ‘yellow boddles’ growing on the bank of a certain small channel at Upton aforesaid called Upton millpond – the same Jane Shaxspere the said sixteenth day of June about the eighth hour after noon of the same day suddenly and by misfortune fell into the same small channel and was drowned in the aforesaid small channel; and then and there she instantly died.”

“And thus the aforesaid flowers were the cause of the death of the aforesaid Jane.”

 

Read more here.

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