Posts Tagged ‘Shakespeare’

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CFP: Shakespeare FuturEd Conference in Sydney

April 19, 2018

Something sent over from Sydney:

Shakespeare FuturEd is an international conference exploring the nexus of Shakespeare Studies and Education to be held at the University of Sydney on Friday 1 – Saturday 2 February 2019.

We are seeking proposals for papers, panels and workshops that interrogate and experiment with new directions in Shakespeare pedagogy in theory and practice. We welcome proposals from primary and secondary teachers, tertiary educators, researchers, theatre practitioners, and anyone with an interest in Shakespeare and education.

What does Shakespeare education look like now? Where is it headed? What are its accepted norms and critical problems? How is it theorised? How does Shakespeare education manifest in institutions such as schools and universities? How is it performed by theatre companies and community organisations? How is it affected and transformed by digital, virtual and blended learning initiatives and contexts? What is the role played by collaborative educational projects and informal learning environments? How does present Shakespeare education—its theory, practice and needs—relate to imagined or experimental futures for education?

Ideas to consider:

  • Shakespeare: text, performance, adaptation; cultural capital, tradition, innovation; global, local, mandatory, optional, inevitable, valued

  • Education: primary, secondary, tertiary, community; English, Literary Studies, Drama, interdisciplinary, active approaches, collaboration; flipped classrooms, blended and online learning, virtual and augmented reality, gamification; open access, corporatisation, marketplace, cultural capital; standards, audit culture, professionalism; the future of education

  • Theory: purpose of education, philosophy, ethics, aesthetics, creativity; socialisation, democracy, freedom; historicism, formalism, presentism

  • Teacher: expert, professional, innovator; facilitator, curator, collaborator; instrument, practitioner, researcher

  • Student: learner, collaborator, player; consumer, client, authority

Please send 250 word proposals ( and a short biography) to: claire.hansen3@jcu.edu.au. CFP closes 31 October 2018.

For more information, visit the website: www.shakespearereloaded.edu.au/conference

 

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Cardiff’s @Mark_Truesdale reflects on his new book The King and Commoner Tradition

February 26, 2018

9780815364764Having shared the corridors of the Cardiff School of English, Communication and Philosophy with Dr Mark Truesdale for a number of years, I was interested in how he thought his book had emerged from this milieu. @DrJ_Gregory

In this blog post Mark reflects on just that:

While studying for my MA at Cardiff University, I developed a keen interest in politicised readings of medieval outlaw tales while also being fascinated by the fools of early modern drama and their relationship with those in power. This left me rather torn as to what direction to pursue for my PhD. Fortunately, at this crossroads Stephen Knight introduced me to the ‘King and Commoner’ tale of King Edward and the Shepherd (c. 1400-1450) in which several of these interests seemed to intersect. Here was a comic tale of a forest-dwelling trickster who critiques the court’s abuses, poaches the king’s deer and encounters a disguised monarch. The late-medieval tradition it comes from abounds with incognito kings and commoner carnival feasting in upside-down worlds, interrogating class relations against a backdrop of court oppression and proto-panoptical surveillance.

Scouring archives and ballad collections over the following years, I discovered that this somewhat neglected tradition was surprisingly widespread, with tales stretching from the tenth century to the nineteenth century. It also boasts an extensive cultural influence that happens to include shaping the early Robin Hood tradition and providing the literary foundation for early modern disguised ruler plays (or more generally the ‘mingling of Kinges and Clownes’, as Sidney puts it); Shakespeare was a particularly enthusiastic fan, adapting the motif for several plays. My monograph emerged from this research. It explores the tradition’s fifteenth-century poems and sixteenth- to eighteenth-century ballads and chapbooks, charting its gradually morphing political character. It also provides extensive appendices to provide context, summarising the medieval tradition’s earlier incarnations and analogues, as well as some of its most notable appearances in early modern drama and beyond.

Cardiff University provided a perfect base from which to study. My research is indebted to a wonderfully supportive community of medieval and early modern academics, as well as departmental funds to present my research at a variety of conferences and visit libraries/archives elsewhere. At Cardiff, I was also lucky to have access to an extensive library manned by hugely helpful librarians. Within ENCAP, I am particularly grateful to Rob Gossedge and Stephen Knight for supervising my PhD thesis, but must also thank Carl Phelpstead, Helen Phillips, Megan Leitch and Martin Coyle, as well as many fellow postgraduate students for providing insightful and helpful comments or advice throughout the course of my research.

The King and Commoner Tradition: Carnivalesque Politics in Medieval and Early Modern Literature was published this year in the Routledge series, ‘Outlaws in Literature, History, and Culture’. Find out more from the Routledge website. Follow Mark on twitter at @Mark_Truesdale.

 

 

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Richard III Redux: Save the date

February 3, 2018

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An exciting production touring Wales this March will be a new take on Shakespeare’s Richard III. The production asks:

In this reimagining of Shakespeare’s Richard III, how does the story change, the character change, the body change, the acting change, when explored by a disabled actress with deadly comic timing and a dislike of horses? How do previous star vehicle Richards measure up to this reimagined Richard?

Follow Sara Beer and Kaite O’Reilly on twitter for more, and visit Kaite’s blog here. For the Cardiff Shakespeare review of Richard III at the Royal Welsh College last year, see here. On ‘Richard III and staging disability’, visit the British Library website here. Those with access to English Studies can also view a recent article on Richard III and ‘Performing Disability’ (Let me know if you don’t have access but would like to read it @DrJ_Gregory).

 

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Shakespeare’s Richard III: @RWCMD Cardiff

September 25, 2017

The Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama consistently provide thought-provoking and engaging stagings of Shakespeare’s plays – well worth going to check this out:

Thursday 19 October – Saturday 28 October 7.15pm
Matinee Wednesday 25 October 2.30pm
No performances Sun & Mon
BSL interpreted performance on Saturday 28 October. Interpreted by Julie Doyle.

by William Shakespeare
Directed by Joe Murphy

My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
And every tongue brings in a several tale,
And every tale condemns me for a villain. 

Named the most fascinating historical figure in a poll last year of British historians and the public, Richard III continues to provoke debate. Shakespeare’s brutal play portrays him as a ruthless, power hungry villain, who will stop at nothing to gain the throne occupied by his brother.

Venue: Richard Burton Theatre

Tickets: £13, £11 concessions, Under 25s £6

Find out more

 

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‘Nature’s Fragile Vessel’: Journal article by @DrJ_Gregory

August 4, 2017

My journal article on ‘”Nature’s Fragile Vessel”: Rethinking approaches to material culture in literature’ has been published this week ‘Online First’ and will be in the next issue of Cahiers Élisabéthains: A Journal of English Renaissance Studies.

Abstract

The notion of fragility is a pervasive one in Western culture. Considering its appearance in early modern texts can help us to understand the history of fragility, as an idea, metaphor and feeling. The relationship between humans and breakable things is used as a metaphor that recognizes human limitations in body or mind. This essay begins with one peculiar instance of fragility from Shakespeare’s Timon of Athens before analysing other examples in early modern culture. It ends by making a few tentative propositions regarding the relationships between literature, material culture and the representations of human fragility.

Read the article (open access)

As well as reading the one instance in Shakespeare’s work where the word ‘fragile’ is used, the essay considers other early modern writing and paintings. I’m especially interested in the way that people are described in literature as being fragile like an object, whether that object is a ship at sea, or a fragile vase on the edge of a table.

The essay is partly me working out my next steps in this area for a larger project, as well as being an attempt to negotiate the scholarly field as it relates to material culture and object-studies, the idea of the human, and the (now, not so recent) turn to the study of literature and the emotions. It seems to me that these three areas are highly contested and fraught with different priorities, perspectives, and concerns; but these three interdisciplinary research foci still have huge potential in terms of developing new research methodologies, research impact (outside of academia), and, of course, thinking about our engagement with literature.

I’d welcome any comments. My contact details are on my profile page.

Four Ages of Man (national gallery)

The Four Ages of Man (Valentin de Boulogne)

Join the Cardiff Shakespeare Facebook group.

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Shakespeare performances in Cardiff and nearby this summer

June 30, 2017

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There seems to be so much Shakespeare lined up for the summer it’s difficult to keep track. However, I’m going to have a quick look about and see what I can collect together here. Please let me know if I’ve missed anything and I can add it.

We don’t have anyone lined up to review these, so if you are interested please get in touch with me.

Some of the productions detailed below are playing elsewhere and fairly nearby too. Just follow the links on the play titles to find out more.

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Wednesday 5 July A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Ballet Cymru at Grand Pavilion, Porthcawl

Wednesday 5 July The Tempest
Taking Flight Theatre Production in Newport (2pm and 7pm)

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Thursday & Friday, 6-7 July The Comedy of Errors
The Lord Chamberlain’s Men at Cardiff Castle (Gates open 6.30pm)

Friday 7 July The Merry Wives of Windsor
The Festival Players at Caerleon Amphitheater, near Newport (7.30pm)

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Thursday & Friday 13-14 July Richard III
Showcase Performing Arts at Redhouse, Merthyr Tydfil (7pm)

Friday 14 July The Taming of the Shrew
Heartbreak Productions at Chepstow Castle (7.30pm)

Saturday 15 July A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Fringe Theatre Festival, YMCA, Cardiff (2-3pm)

Sunday 23 July Twelfth Night
Everyman Youth production in Sophia Gardens, Cardiff (7.30pm)

20-29 July Macbeth
Everyman production in Sophia Gardens, Cardiff (Saturday at 3pm, and otherwise 8pm; no Sundays)

Saturday 29 July The Tempest
Taking Flight Theatre Production in Cardiff (Noon)

Sunday 30 July The Tempest
Taking Flight Theatre Production in Penarth (4pm)

 

Illyria TheatreSaturday 5 August The Comedy of Errors
Illyria production in Abergavenny (7pm)

Join our Cardiff Shakespeare Facebook group here.

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Taking Flight Theatre @takingflightco : The Tempest

June 8, 2017

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Taking Flight Theatre return, this time with their unique take on Shakespeare’s The Tempest.

Join the Magic Staff Liner Corporation and indulge yourself with a jaunt on the newest addition to their fleet- their number one luxury ocean liner, The Remembrance.  Let their crew take care of your every worry, your every woe on their 10 year anniversary cruise to the Island that Time Forgot.

Expect lots of laughs, physical comedy, live original music and most of all expect the unexpected.

This performance has live integrated BSL interpretation and audio description. Touch tours and BSL introductions are available by arrangement- please contact beth@takingflighttheatre.co.uk or on 07785 947823 to discuss this, or any other access requirement.

This is an outdoor performance so please wrap up warm and bring your brolly/sun cream/blanket/travel chair!

Performance dates: 

Thursday 8th, Friday 9th, Saturday 10th performances in Thompson’s Park. Audience to meet at the Romilly Road entrance.

Sunday 18th performance in Roath Park. Audience to meet at the conservatory entrance.

Read our review of last year’s Shakespeare production.

Visit the Taking Flight website, book tickets, and find out about their performances outside of Cardiff too.

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