Posts Tagged ‘Conference’

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BritGrad 2016: Call for Papers – Deadline March 21st @britgrad

March 18, 2016

From the BritGrad team:

2-4 June 2016

The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

We invite graduate students with interests in Shakespeare, Renaissance, and Early Modern Studies to submit paper proposals for the Eighteenth Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference.

This interdisciplinary conference provides a friendly and stimulating academic forum in which graduate students from all over the world can present their research and meet together in an active centre of Shakespeare research: Shakespeare’s hometown of Stratford-upon-Avon.

The theme of this year’s conference is ‘400 Years and Counting: Celebrating Early Modern Drama’, tying into the 2016 anniversary celebrations. In accordance with the Shakespeare Institute’s emerging reputation as a place for creative criticism, we also encourage creative responses. Undergraduate students in their final two years of study are invited to attend the conference as auditors (non-speakers).

This year our line-up of plenary speakers includes John Jowett (The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham), and Martin Killeen (University of Birmingham). See our blog for information on plenary speakers as they are confirmed. Attendees will also have the opportunity to attend the RSC production of Hamlet, directed by Simon Godwin and starring Paapa Essiedu, at a group-booking price. Lunch will be provided each day, and there will be a party and reception for attendees.

We invite abstracts of up to 200 words proposing papers twenty minutes in length on subjects relating to Shakespeare, Early Modern, and/or Renaissance Studies. More creative forms of criticism, such as original writing or performance, may also be submitted, also requiring a 200-word abstract. We welcome papers from a wide variety of disciplines, from literature to art and cultural history and beyond.

Deadline for Paper Proposals: 23:59 GMT on 21 March 2016.

Presenters will be notified of acceptance in time to register by 21 April and secure any necessary visas. Auditors are encouraged to register by 19 May for early-bird pricing. Due to the growing success of this annual conference, we strongly encourage early registration to ensure a place on the conference programme.

For more information you can find us on Facebook, Twitter, and at britgrad.wordpress.com. Our email address is britgrad.conference@gmail.com; please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

 

 

 

 
 

 

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CFP: Shakespeare and Waste (Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory)

April 1, 2015

ANNOUNCING A NEW SERIES OF SHAKESPEARE EVENTS FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS AND EARLY CAREER SCHOLARS

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS), part of the London Graduate School, announces the launch of Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory (KiSSiT): a series of seminars and conferences for postgraduate students and early career scholars with an interest in Shakespeare, philosophy and theory. The program will be committed to thinking through Shakespeare about urgent contemporary issues in dialogue with the work of past and present philosophers – from Aristotle to Žižek. It is intended that one-day KiSSiT conferences will be held three times a year at the Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames, which was developed by the great director Sir Peter Hall to be a ‘teaching theatre’, where actors and academics would work together. KiSSiTevents will be free and open to all. The inaugural KiSSIT conference will take place at the Rose Theatre on Saturday 23 May, 2015, on the theme of SHAKESPEARE AND WASTE (see CFP below). Auditors are also encouraged to attend. Confirmed speakers include Scott Wilson (Kingston University) andPeter Smith (Nottingham Trent University). Although there is no attendance fee, seating is limited, and registration is necessary: see email contact below. Reduced-price tickets will be available to all participants for the evening performance at the Rose Theatre of Jonathan Miller’s acclaimed production of King Lear, starring Barrie Rutter   CFP: SHAKESPEARE AND WASTE The Oxford English Dictionary lists three main senses for ‘waste’ in the English language:

  1. Waste or desert land
  2. Action or process of wasting
  3. Waste matter, refuse

The conference invites abstracts for 20 minute papers which fit under these broad headings. Papers might consider, but are not limited to, the following areas and questions:

  • The early modern association between waste and idleness
  • The link between waste (land) and wilderness
  • Waste paper
  • Economic concerns relating to Shakespeare
  • Do waste products of the body suggest a leveling and/or intensification of social hierarchy?
  • The relationship between human waste and abjection
  • The concept of human waste associated with digestion, purging, emetics, and / or blood-letting
  • The concept and processes of ‘catharsis’ in relation to waste
  • Waste in King Lear
  • What does the imagery of contamination by human waste (muddy fountains / cisterns, stains, filth) suggest about the relationship between racial and ethnic groups?
  • Human waste as the traditional Protestant symbol of money; conversely, money as the denial of feces and its evocation of the human body as pure physicality

Organizers: Johann Gregory, Paul Hamilton, Anne Sophie Refskou, Timo Uotinen, Richard Wilson. Please submit abstracts and brief CVs, or register as an auditor, by emailing the organizers at kingstonshakespeareintheory@gmail.com before 1 May, 2015 (auditors may register before 15 May) Please indicate whether you would like to book a ticket for King Lear in your mail.

Visit this website for the latest:
https://kingstonshakespeareseminar.wordpress.com/kingston-shakespeare-in-theory/
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CFP Deadline Extended: The Marcher Metaphysicals Conference

March 9, 2015

 

Extended Deadline until 1 May

The Marcher Metaphysicals Conference

29 October-1 November 2015
Gregynog Hall, Tregynon, Mid-Wales

The Welsh Marches, Marchia Walliae, or Y Mers in Welsh, constitute an extensive area around the boundary between England and Wales. This border country, in its breadth and somewhat hazy demarcation, defies precise definition, and invites fluidity of ideas and perception. The Marches are both a place in their own right, and an approach to somewhere else; they form a site of great natural beauty but also of historic political contention. Norman conquerors used these lands to subdue the native Welsh, as well as to create a jurisdiction separate from the English crown. Shakespeare represented them as a wild, rebel landscape, full of magic. The Marches were the imaginative home to a number of seventeenth-century poets who were interested in exploring the boundaries between material and spiritual experience. Their work forms the main focus of this conference. Equally important to our discussions will be the ways in which this poetic tradition has been updated and reinvigorated by Welsh and English poets in more recent times.

This conference seeks to explore the relationship between the early modern ‘metaphysical’ poets and the Marches that provided them with both material and imaginative landscapes. What influence did this place and its collective consciousness have on poets such as George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, Thomas Traherne and John Donne? How did these poets express an understanding of boundaries, power and resistance, and an appreciation of the beauty of the natural environment that informed them? How did their poetry speak to the aesthetic, religious, philosophical and political movements of the seventeenth century? How have the Marches, and indeed these poets, influenced modern poetry, helping poets to find new ways of describing and influencing a world beyond borders.

The conference will take place from the afternoon of Thursday 29 October to the morning of Sunday 1 November 2015 at Gregynog Hall, the historic house which is also the conference centre of the University of Wales. Gregynog is itself located in the Welsh Marches, near Newtown in Montgomeryshire, and is set in its own extensive and attractive grounds. It will form an appropriate and conducive setting for the discussion of the Marcher Metaphysicals.

We invite e-mail submissions for papers that explore the historical contexts, influences, and links shared by the seventeenth-century metaphysical poets, pursue fresh readings of their poetry or work critically with more recent British poets who have followed their tradition in negotiating geographical, linguistic, political or spiritual borders. The conference organisers also welcome submissions from poets and other creative artists inspired by the Welsh Marches and actively exploring the idea of ‘borders’.

For 15-20-minute papers, please send a 250-word titled abstract; for a complete 3-4-person panel, please send an overall title and individual 250-word titled abstracts for each paper; for creative presentations, please send a 250-word description indicating any other introductory materials (PDFs, CDs, DVDs) that the conference programming committee might then request for evaluation.

You should send your submissions to marchermets@bangor.ac.uk

Please indicate Marcher Metaphysicals 2015 in your subject line and include a 1-page CV giving an e-mail and a regular mail address. You should also indicate any expected audio-visual needs.

Deadline for submissions: extended until the 1st of May!

Conference organisers: Dr Joseph Sterrett (Aarhus University, Denmark) and Prof Helen Wilcox (Bangor University, Wales)
Conference advisory committee: Dr Erik Ankerberg (Milwaukee Lutheran University, U.S.A.), Dr Chloe Preedy (Exeter University, England) and Dr Elizabeth Ford (Open University, Cardiff, Wales)

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Cardifff Uni Speakers at “Shakespeare: The Philosopher” Conference

September 12, 2014

Christopher Norris and Sophie Battell will be speaking today at the conference “Shakespeare: The Philosopher” taking place at the University of Hertfordshire.

Norris, Distinguished Research Professor at Cardiff, is speaking on Wittgenstein and Shakespeare. Battell, a PhD candidate at Cardiff, is speaking on “Language and Exile in Richard II“.

Find out more here:

http://www.herts.ac.uk/about-us/events/2014/september/shakespeare-the-philosopher

Cardiff Shakespeare has a new twitter account – at the same handle @CardiffShakes. Please re-follow!

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Early Modern Memory Conference

May 8, 2014

Rivetingly plausible … Greg Hicks as Leontes in The Winter’s Tale at the RSC Photograph: Tristram Kenton

Sophie Battell (Cardiff University) will be speaking at the Early Modern Memory Conference, Worcester University, 8-9 May.

Her paper is entitled:

“‘Flowers of Winter’: The dramatic animation of memory in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale

Find out more about the conference here.

 

 

 

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Shakespeare in Florence

April 7, 2013

BI Florence

Shakespeare Graduate Conference in Florence

The annual all-day conference, now in its fifth
year, with papers (in English and Italian) given
by doctoral candidates and recent PhDs from
Italian universities on the works of Shakespeare
and his contemporaries. Sessions will be chaired
by Professor Fernando Cioni (University of
Florence) and Professor Shaul Bassi (University
of Venice). For details see the website.

 

Shakespeare Week: The Tempest

April 15-18

Please download the programme for full details of events.

Monday 15 April

16:00   Public reading of The Tempest

19:30   Film: Peter Greenaway’s Prospero’s Books

 

Tuesday 16 April

16:00   Film: Julie Taymor’s The Tempest (2010)

18:00   Exhibition: Virtue and Vengeance.  Sketches and finished pieces from fashion students at Florence University of the Arts.

 

Wednesday 17 April

18:00   Lecture: Alessandro Serpieri, ‘The Tempest  in a span of time.’

20:00   Film: Derek Jarman’s The Tempest (1979)

 

Thursday 18 April

9:15   Shakespeare Graduate Conference

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Renaissance Men in the Middle Temple Conference

January 13, 2013

“The four Inns of Court were, according to Ben Jonson, ‘the noblest nurseries of humanity’.  All highly influential in terms of their members’ legal, political and artistic roles, the Middle Temple proved a particularly fertile context.  At the end of Elizabeth’s reign especially, the Middle Temple saw many of its members involved in the creation, reception and development of literature and performance.  Most importantly, perhaps, the Inn was a training ground for men who came to transgress and challenge societal norms, and whose future careers were to influence disparate areas of life, before, during and after the Civil War: from Sir John Davies’ work on dance, John Marston’s contribution to drama or Robert Cotton’s influence as an antiquarian to, in later years, the political impact of Henry Ireton or Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon.

The early modern Inns of Court have been the subjects of much recent academic work.  Last year’s publications of The Intellectual and Cultural World of the Early Modern Inns of Court, edited by Archer, Goldring and Knight, and a History of the Middle Temple, edited by Richard Havery, as well as the 2010 appearance of the Inns of Court REED volume, edited by Alan Nelson, have significantly added to our understanding of the Inns and their interactions with many aspects of early modern culture.”

Find out more about the  Renaissance Men in the Middle Temple conference here:

http://middletemple2013.wordpress.com/draft-programme/

 

Dr Charlotte Mathieson

Website of Dr Charlotte Mathieson

Shakespeare Institute Library

Info on Shakespeare, Renaissance literature and other useful library and research stuff.

GEMS

Group for Early Modern Studies

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A blog about Cardiff, its people, and the alternative arts and cultural scene!

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A Public Humanities Website for Enthusiasts of 18th-Century Studies

ESTS

The European Society for Textual Scholarship

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the history of 'the unruly sort of clowns' and other early modern peculiarities