Posts Tagged ‘Cardiff University’

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Victorian Illustrated Shakespeare Archive launched by @CardiffUni PhD Student

August 26, 2016

Michael John Goodman

This week Michael John Goodman launched the Victorian Illustrated Shakespeare Archive. This is a valuable resource featuring over 3000 illustrations from the four major illustrated editions of Shakespeare’s Complete Works in the Victorian period. Michael Goodman, a PhD candidate at Cardiff University, has painstakingly scanned, tagged and prepared these images and made them available under a creative commons license for others to play around with. This archive is already making me think differently about Shakespeare. For example, I’ve discovered an illustration of Ariel from The Tempest dressed up in a way similar to the representations of Lady Fortune. This begs the question, might Ariel represent a figure of fortune somehow?

Check out the archive here:

https://shakespeareillustration.org/

Congratulations on a spectacular achievement Mikey!

[Johann Gregory]

 

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A Midsummer Night’s Dream Production @actonecardiff

February 8, 2016

midsummerx

10-13 Feb, 2016

Llanover Hall

Act One Society

A Midsummer Night’s Dream is one of Shakespeare’s most famous comedies. Revolving around three love stories there is plenty of room for farcical drama and of course Shakespeare’s favourite – weddings. However this production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream will look at some of the darker elements hinted in the script – the stark class boundaries and the domination of the wealthy. Set in a dystopian future, it is only within the nature of the forest that the love and laughter can be found.

Director: Bex Landale
Production Manager: Undine Kalcenaua
Choreographer: Lucy Spain

*** TICKETS ARE ON SALE!! ***
For Cardiff Students: http://www.cardiffstudents.com/activities/society/actone/
For General Public:
http://midsummercardiff.wix.com/dream#!blank/c24vq

 

 

 

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CFP: Magic and the Supernatural in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods

April 10, 2015

Cardiff University Postgraduate Conference, July 21st 2015

An understanding of magic and the supernatural is crucial to the study of the medieval and early modern periods. Magic was a part of everyday life, ingrained into the cultural world view and popular imagination. It was also elusive, encompassing a plurality of meanings and forms that permeated every level of society and resulted in a wide range of practices, from those based on folkloric beliefs to quasi-religious rituals. As a means of understanding and attempting to control the social, spiritual, and natural world, it could be both a comfort and a threat to established norms.

We welcome papers exploring the significance of magic and the supernatural to medieval and early modern thought.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:

  • Magic and religion
  • Magic and science
  • Attitudes towards magic and the supernatural
  • Science fiction and fantasy
  • Alchemy
  • Ritual magic
  • The psychology of magic
  • Magic and technology
  • Magicians and cunning folk
  • Astrology
  • Angels and demons
  • Ghosts and apparitions
  • Witchcraft
  • Medicine and anatomy
  • Shape-shifting
  • Supernatural creatures
  • Otherworlds
  • Prophecy and dreams
  • Necromancy and conjuring

We welcome abstracts from postgraduate students and early career researchers on all aspects of this topic in medieval and early modern history, literature, art, archaeology, architecture, and music.

Please send abstracts of 200-300 words to supernatural@cardiff.ac.uk for papers no longer than 20 minutes by Monday 25th May, 2015.

Find out more here: https://magicandthesupernaturalcardiff.wordpress.com/

In addition to panels, the conference will feature keynote addresses from Professor Ronald Hutton from the University of Bristol and Dr. Darren Oldridge from the University of Worcester.

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A Year in Shakespeare: The Merry Wives of Windsor

February 5, 2015

 

“This is an odd play to come upon at this point, only three texts into my grand project to read all the works of Shakespeare in a year. In truth, it’s the closest Shakespeare ever came to writing the Renaissance equivalent of a spin-off TV show. The story goes that Queen Elizabeth I was so delighted with Shakespeare’s greatest comic creation, Sir John Falstaff, that when he stomped off the stage at the close of Henry IV Part 2, she demanded the playwright write a sequel, bringing the fat knight to England in the modern day and giving him a love story. In some accounts, she was so impatient she only gave him a fortnight to write the play. Wisely, Shakespeare did as the Queen bid him, but – perhaps wary of the possibility of having to write new episodes of The Falstaff Show until Kingdom Come – promptly killed Falstaff off at the beginning of Henry V. But all of that is a long way in the future – somewhere in June, when I’m out of the comedies and midway through the histories.

In search of an interesting edition to read the play in, I turned to the bookshelves in the postgraduate office, ever an interesting guide to people’s interests and research topics…”

 

Read more from Thomas Tyrrell (Cardiff University) here.

 

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A Year in Shakespeare: Two Gentlemen of Verona

January 20, 2015

 

“After reading The Tempest in the RSC’s modern edition of the First Folio, I decided to do something different with Two Gentlemen of Verona and read it in the oldest edition Cardiff University Library still kept on loan. After a few minutes browsing the dustiest and least regarded avenues of Shakespeare Criticism, I found myself holding a 122 year-old edition published in 1893 as part of the original Cambridge Shakespeare series.” – Thomas Tyrrell

 

Read more here:

A Year in Shakespeare: Two Gentlemen of Verona

 

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‘Perceptions of Wales in Shakespeare’: TALK TODAY

December 5, 2014

Embedded image permalink

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Cardiff’s week long Shakespeare 450 celebration from 1st December @CardiffUniLib

November 28, 2014

To celebrate the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth, Cardiff University Libraries are holding a week long Shakespeare 450 celebration from 1st – 5th December.

Find out more here

More news to follow…

 

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Cardifff Uni Speakers at “Shakespeare: The Philosopher” Conference

September 12, 2014

Christopher Norris and Sophie Battell will be speaking today at the conference “Shakespeare: The Philosopher” taking place at the University of Hertfordshire.

Norris, Distinguished Research Professor at Cardiff, is speaking on Wittgenstein and Shakespeare. Battell, a PhD candidate at Cardiff, is speaking on “Language and Exile in Richard II“.

Find out more here:

http://www.herts.ac.uk/about-us/events/2014/september/shakespeare-the-philosopher

Cardiff Shakespeare has a new twitter account – at the same handle @CardiffShakes. Please re-follow!

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“Talking Turk”: Linguistic Otherness in Massinger’s The Renegado (1624)

July 8, 2014

Othello and Desdemona in Venice, Théodore Chassériau, 1850

“Are we turned Turks and to ourselves do that / Which heaven hath forbid the Ottomites?” (Othello 2.3.164-5)

Sophie Battell (Cardiff University) will be giving a paper today at the Durham University conference “On the Fringes: Outsiders and Otherness in the Medieval and Early Modern Worlds”. Her paper is entitled “Talking Turk: Linguistic Otherness in Massinger’s The Renegado (1624)”. Mark Truesdale from Cardiff University will also be giving a paper at the conference, entitled “‘I will cracke thy crowne’: The Carnivalesque Politics of the Fifteenth-Century King and Commoner Tradition”.

Find out more here.

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Garrick and Shakespeare Conference

May 29, 2014

Garrick and Shakespeare

Melanie Bigold, Rob Gossedge, and Irene Morra from Cardiff University will be speaking at the Garrick and Shakespeare conference in June. Find out more below:

Wednesday 25 June – Friday 27 June 2014

Venue: Rose Theatre, 24-26 High Street, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT1 1HL

Price: £95 (concessions) – £155 (full rate)

Speaker: Simon Callow, Michael Dobson, Norma Clarke and Peter Holland

The conference will include a lecture by Simon Callow CBE, a trip to Garrick’s Temple in Hampton, a performance by the Hampton Players of ‘The Celebrated Mr Garrick’ and the British premier screening of Simon Callow’s new film Miss in her Teens, based on David Garrick’s 1747 play of the same name.

Speakers include:

  • Prof Michael Dobson (Shakespeare Institute)
  • Prof Norma Clarke (Kingston University)
  • Prof Peter Holland (University of Notre Dame)

David Garrick’s Kingston connections date from 1754, when he bought the house beside the Thames known ever after as Garrick’s Villa, and built his Shakespeare Temple, where he would be famously painted by Zoffany. So, as part of the 2014 Kingston Connections programme of events, Kingston University and the Rose Theatre will jointly host an academic conference to celebrate the great Shakespearean actor and director and commemorate his legacy to the Royal Borough.

Actor, manager, playwright, versifier, Garrick excelled in many parts, and was possibly both the most praised and vilified cultural celebrity of his generation. Authors whose plays he rejected and performers he did not employ were not sparing in their attacks. “Garrick and Shakespeare” seeks therefore to focus on his achievements as a Shakespearean interpreter and impresario, and to re-examine Garrick’s controversial reputation.

View the full programme (PDF).

Booking is essential to attend this event.

 

Find out more here.

 

 

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