Posts Tagged ‘Call For Papers’

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CFP: Magic and the Supernatural in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods

April 10, 2015

Cardiff University Postgraduate Conference, July 21st 2015

An understanding of magic and the supernatural is crucial to the study of the medieval and early modern periods. Magic was a part of everyday life, ingrained into the cultural world view and popular imagination. It was also elusive, encompassing a plurality of meanings and forms that permeated every level of society and resulted in a wide range of practices, from those based on folkloric beliefs to quasi-religious rituals. As a means of understanding and attempting to control the social, spiritual, and natural world, it could be both a comfort and a threat to established norms.

We welcome papers exploring the significance of magic and the supernatural to medieval and early modern thought.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:

  • Magic and religion
  • Magic and science
  • Attitudes towards magic and the supernatural
  • Science fiction and fantasy
  • Alchemy
  • Ritual magic
  • The psychology of magic
  • Magic and technology
  • Magicians and cunning folk
  • Astrology
  • Angels and demons
  • Ghosts and apparitions
  • Witchcraft
  • Medicine and anatomy
  • Shape-shifting
  • Supernatural creatures
  • Otherworlds
  • Prophecy and dreams
  • Necromancy and conjuring

We welcome abstracts from postgraduate students and early career researchers on all aspects of this topic in medieval and early modern history, literature, art, archaeology, architecture, and music.

Please send abstracts of 200-300 words to supernatural@cardiff.ac.uk for papers no longer than 20 minutes by Monday 25th May, 2015.

Find out more here: https://magicandthesupernaturalcardiff.wordpress.com/

In addition to panels, the conference will feature keynote addresses from Professor Ronald Hutton from the University of Bristol and Dr. Darren Oldridge from the University of Worcester.

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CFP: Shakespeare and Waste (Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory)

April 1, 2015

ANNOUNCING A NEW SERIES OF SHAKESPEARE EVENTS FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS AND EARLY CAREER SCHOLARS

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS), part of the London Graduate School, announces the launch of Kingston Shakespeare Seminar in Theory (KiSSiT): a series of seminars and conferences for postgraduate students and early career scholars with an interest in Shakespeare, philosophy and theory. The program will be committed to thinking through Shakespeare about urgent contemporary issues in dialogue with the work of past and present philosophers – from Aristotle to Žižek. It is intended that one-day KiSSiT conferences will be held three times a year at the Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames, which was developed by the great director Sir Peter Hall to be a ‘teaching theatre’, where actors and academics would work together. KiSSiTevents will be free and open to all. The inaugural KiSSIT conference will take place at the Rose Theatre on Saturday 23 May, 2015, on the theme of SHAKESPEARE AND WASTE (see CFP below). Auditors are also encouraged to attend. Confirmed speakers include Scott Wilson (Kingston University) andPeter Smith (Nottingham Trent University). Although there is no attendance fee, seating is limited, and registration is necessary: see email contact below. Reduced-price tickets will be available to all participants for the evening performance at the Rose Theatre of Jonathan Miller’s acclaimed production of King Lear, starring Barrie Rutter   CFP: SHAKESPEARE AND WASTE The Oxford English Dictionary lists three main senses for ‘waste’ in the English language:

  1. Waste or desert land
  2. Action or process of wasting
  3. Waste matter, refuse

The conference invites abstracts for 20 minute papers which fit under these broad headings. Papers might consider, but are not limited to, the following areas and questions:

  • The early modern association between waste and idleness
  • The link between waste (land) and wilderness
  • Waste paper
  • Economic concerns relating to Shakespeare
  • Do waste products of the body suggest a leveling and/or intensification of social hierarchy?
  • The relationship between human waste and abjection
  • The concept of human waste associated with digestion, purging, emetics, and / or blood-letting
  • The concept and processes of ‘catharsis’ in relation to waste
  • Waste in King Lear
  • What does the imagery of contamination by human waste (muddy fountains / cisterns, stains, filth) suggest about the relationship between racial and ethnic groups?
  • Human waste as the traditional Protestant symbol of money; conversely, money as the denial of feces and its evocation of the human body as pure physicality

Organizers: Johann Gregory, Paul Hamilton, Anne Sophie Refskou, Timo Uotinen, Richard Wilson. Please submit abstracts and brief CVs, or register as an auditor, by emailing the organizers at kingstonshakespeareintheory@gmail.com before 1 May, 2015 (auditors may register before 15 May) Please indicate whether you would like to book a ticket for King Lear in your mail.

Visit this website for the latest:
https://kingstonshakespeareseminar.wordpress.com/kingston-shakespeare-in-theory/
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CFP: The Marcher Metaphysicals

September 19, 2014

The Marcher Metaphysicals Conference,

29 October – 1 November 2015,

Gregynog Hall, Tregynon, Mid-Wales

The Welsh Marches, Marchia Walliae, or Y Mers in Welsh, constitute an extensive area around the boundary between England and Wales. This border country, in its breadth and somewhat hazy demarcation, defies precise definition, and invites fluidity of ideas and perception. The Marches are both a place in their own right, and an approach to somewhere else; they form a site of great natural beauty but also of historic political contention. Norman conquerors used these lands to subdue the native Welsh, as well as to create a jurisdiction separate from the English crown. Shakespeare represented them as a wild, rebel landscape, full of magic. The Marches were the imaginative home to a number of seventeenth-century poets who were interested in exploring the boundaries between material and spiritual experience. Their work forms the main focus of this conference. Equally important to our discussions will be the ways in which this poetic tradition has been updated and reinvigorated by Welsh and English poets in more recent times.

This conference seeks to explore the relationship between the early modern ‘metaphysical’ poets and the Marches that provided them with both material and imaginative landscapes. What influence did this place and its collective consciousness have on poets such as George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, Thomas Traherne and John Donne? How did these poets express an understanding of boundaries, power and resistance, and an appreciation of the beauty of the natural environment that informed them? How did their poetry speak to the aesthetic, religious, philosophical and political movements of the seventeenth century? How have the Marches, and indeed these poets, influenced modern poetry, helping poets to find new ways of describing and influencing a world beyond borders.

The conference will take place from the afternoon of Thursday 29 October to the morning of Sunday 1 November 2015 at Gregynog Hall, the historic house which is also the conference centre of the University of Wales. Gregynog is itself located in the Welsh Marches, near Newtown in Montgomeryshire, and is set in its own extensive and attractive grounds. It will form an appropriate and conducive setting for the discussion of the Marcher Metaphysicals.

We invite e-mail submissions for papers that explore the historical contexts, influences, and links shared by the seventeenth-century metaphysical poets, pursue fresh readings of their poetry or work critically with more recent British poets who have followed their tradition in negotiating geographical, linguistic, political or spiritual borders. The conference organisers also welcome submissions from poets and other creative artists inspired by the Welsh Marches and actively exploring the idea of ‘borders’.
For 15-20-minute papers, please send a 250-word titled abstract; for a complete 3-4-person panel, please send an overall title and individual 250-word titled abstracts for each paper; for creative presentations, please send a 250-word description indicating any other introductory materials (PDFs, CDs, DVDs) that the conference programming committee might then request for evaluation.

***

You should send your submissions to marchermets@bangor.ac.uk
Please indicate Marcher Metaphysicals 2015 in your subject line and include a 1-page CV giving an e-mail and a regular mail address. You should also indicate any expected audio-visual needs.
Deadline for submissions: 28 February 2015

Conference organisers: Dr Joseph Sterrett (Aarhus University, Denmark) and Prof Helen Wilcox (Bangor University, Wales)
Conference advisory committee: Dr Erik Ankerberg (Milwaukee Lutheran University, U.S.A.), Dr Elizabeth Ford (Open University, Cardiff, Wales) and Dr Chloe Preedy (Exeter University, England)

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Call for Papers ‘I take thee at thy word’: Trust in Renaissance Literature

August 16, 2013

What qualities compose trust and confidence in the Renaissance?  What signs call it into question?  This seminar seeks to identify points of congruence and contention in sixteenth and seventeenth century notions of trust and how they might be betrayed. From the stage Machiavel who discloses his plans to the audience to the kinsman who pledges his fealty, or the lover who exchanges his faithful vow, how did trust differ across such different domains as religious and political life or familial relations?  It is hoped that papers will cross a range of genres including early modern poetry, prose, and drama, as well as major and minor authors. The intended outcome will be to publish suitable papers in a special issue of Textual Practice.

This seminar will be part of the interdisciplinary MatchPoints Conference 2014 at Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, 22-24 May 2014 (www.matchpoints.au.dk).  Plenary speakers include Robert Putnam (Harvard University), Eric Uslaner (University of Maryland), Gerd Achenbach (Lessing-Hochschule zu Berlin, Philosophische Praxis), Mikael Rostila (Stockholm University), Alison Findlay (Lancaster University), Svend Andersen (Aarhus University), Cheryl Mattingly (University of Southern California), Sverre Raffnsøe (Copenhagen Business School).

Organised by Joseph Sterrett

Please send 150 word proposals to engjs [at] hum.au.dk by 15 January 2014.

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CFP Shakespeare Inside-out: Depth/Surface/Meaning

March 10, 2011

5th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference




NEWS:

 

On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the BSA Events Committee, we are delighted to announce that the 5th Biennial British Shakespeare Association conference will take place at Lancaster University on 24th-26th February 2012. Building on the success of our previous conferences at King’s College, Warwick, Newcastle and De Monfort, this conference will provide an opportunity for Shakespeareans from a variety of backgrounds to come together and discuss their work. By moving the conference date to February, we are also able to celebrate the BSA’s 10th birthday. We very much look forward to working with Professor Alison Findlay and her team at the University of Lancaster on this major event for the British Shakespeare Association.

 

The title of the conference is Shakespeare Inside-out: Depth/Surface/Meaning. Shakespeare’s texts produce meaning by turning insides out. We are drawn into the plays and poems from the outside through surfaces: books, screens, words, objects, costumes, the surfaces of actors’ faces and bodies, retellings or adaptations, teaching spaces and theatres, and via our experiences of immediate effects like music, laughter, tears, movement. The texts, meanwhile, turn deep human questions, emotions, subjectivities outwards by projecting them as words and performance. This conference will ask how the relationship between surface and depth operates in Shakespeare’s work. How does it function in different types of performance practice from live theatre to film? In the traces of the past that have come down to us? And in our practices as teachers and critics? The conference will explore ‘the deep value of surfaces’ (Shusterman), the dynamic relationship between surface and depth across a range of practices: reading, watching, editing, teaching, performing.

The conference programme includes lectures, workshops, seminars and performances of Much Ado About Nothing at Lancaster Castle (and Love’s Labours’ Lost by Northern Broadsides). Speakers include Barrie Rutter (Northern Broadsides), Professor Jean E. Howard (Columbia University); and Professor R. S. White (Centre for Excellence for the Study of History of the Emotions, University of Western Australia).

Proposals for panels, papers, workshops or presentations on any aspect of the topic are welcomed from across the membership of the BSA by 1 October 2011 and can be emailed to a.g.findlay@lancaster.ac.uk This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
How do rituals and ceremonies in Shakespeare work as superficial orderings of emotion and violence?

Do Shakespeare’s texts offer ‘deeper’ rewritings of source texts or do the inter-textual relationships themselves deserve more in-depth study than they have received to date?

How do adaptations or retellings of Shakespeare act as gateways to and from the texts?

Does music in Shakespearean performances add depth or is it the ‘icing on the cake’?

How much deeper can we dig behind the fairly sparse documentation of early modern theatre practices – playing and watching?

Does learning about Shakespeare happen on an immediately-measurable level or at more intangible cognitive, affective and spiritual levels or both at once?

Is it possible (or even desirable) to quantify what goes on as the result of a performance, a film, a teaching session?

 

View the BSA website here.

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CFP Shakespearean Moments Panel

April 28, 2010

Johann Gregory (Cardiff University) has submitted a CFP for a panel entitled:

Shakespearean Moments: “expectation whirls me round”


The panel will hopefully take place at The Renaissance Society of America conference in 2011 in Montreal.

For more information click here.

To consider Hamlet’s “To be, or not to be” speech an audience must think about what the future might have in store. Like many other Shakespearean moments, Hamlet reflects on past experience and ponders what’s to come while seeming to be stuck in a moment.

Besides the character’s expectations, however, the playwright may have had certain expectations of his players and the audience. Similarly, the audience may have expected something from the title of the play, the place where it was being performed, or which company was performing it, for example.

From a publishing point of view, the title pages, author and even printer may have created expectations, too, for a reading audience.

Shakespearean Moments, therefore, include the expectations of authors, actors, theatregoers, readers, editors, critics and publishers.

Please submit proposals to Johann Gregory at gregoryj@cardiff.ac.uk by Tuesday 18th May 2010 with:

Title and abstract (150 words)

Audio Visual Requirements

Institutional Affiliation

A few lines about your work

Dr Charlotte Mathieson

Website of Dr Charlotte Mathieson

Shakespeare Institute Library

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A Public Humanities Website for Enthusiasts of 18th-Century Studies

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The European Society for Textual Scholarship

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