Archive for October, 2013

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Richard Wilson Inaugural Lecture next Wednesday

October 25, 2013

Richard Wilson

Anniversary Chair and Sir Peter Hall Professor of Shakespeare Studies

 

“Sermons in Stones: Shakespeare’s dangerous thresholds”

The sandstone megalith in front of Kingston’s Rose Theatre was described by John Speed in 1613 as ‘the chair of majesty whereon Athelstan, Edwin and Ethelred sate at their coronations and first received their Sceptre of Imperial Power’. Since it was moved to near its present position in 1850, the debates and legends this sarsen or ‘troublesome stone’ has accumulated say much about changing ideas of history and monarchy. But evidence that the ‘Coronation Stone’ originated in the Saxon chapel that stood beside the Market Place also places it at the threshold of contemporary theories regarding religion and politics, or what the philosopher Giorgio Agamben terms the separation of ‘the kingdom and the glory’. Interpreted in light of these, Kingston’s relic marks the theatrical dimension of power in a politics founded on consent, and the dangers Shakespeare dramatized attending every official entry or inauguration.

Date: 30 October 2013, 5:30pm to
30 October 2013, 8:00pm
Location: Rose Theatre Kingston, 24-26 High Street Kingston
KT1 1HL
Fee: Free but booking required
Booking: https://richardwilson.eventbrite.com

Find out more here.

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CFP: Drama and Pedagogy: Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies 2014 Conference

October 21, 2013

Early English Drama & Performance

12-13 September, 2014, University of Fribourg, Switzerland

Convenors: Elisabeth Dutton and Indira Ghose, University of Fribourg

“In medieval England, when literacy was low and the liturgy in Latin, what did drama teach, and how?  What were the implications for Middle English drama of its vernacularity, and how did it engage Latinity?  The mystery plays teach scriptural material in the vernacular; the morality plays present subtle theological and philosophical teaching through allegory. In the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries drama is a way of disseminating theological and philosophical ideas: in the sixteenth century, with the rise of humanism, drama is one way the academic community debates those ideas. In early modern England, as the theatre came to rival the pulpit as a mass medium, leading many to attack the stage and many others to defend it, did drama teach or seduce, instruct or distract? As historical circumstances change, how does drama balance…

View original post 402 more words

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Shakespeare at the Cinema – in Cardiff

October 14, 2013

Romeo and Juliet

11-17th October Cineworld Cardiff

Carlo Carlei Production (2013)

A stunning new version of Shakespeare’s timeless romantic tragedy from the creator of ‘Downton Abbey’. The Montagues and Capulets are at war, frequently brawling in the streets of Verona. So when Romeo (Douglas Booth) and Juliet (Hailee Steinfeld) fall for each other, life proves difficult for these star-crossed lovers. Friar Laurence (Paul Giamatti) helps them to marry in secret, but the enmity between their families is too strong for a reconciliation. The greatest love story of all time, Shakespeare’s 16th century classic has been reinterpreted time and again. But there hasn’t been a faithful version since Zeffirelli’s 1968 Oscar winner. Now lauded ‘Downton Abbey’ creator Julian Fellowes has scripted this new adaptation, which makes exceptional use of its gorgeous Italian locations. The to-die-for cast is led by Hailee Steinfeld, who was Oscar nominated for her performance in ‘True Grit’, and Douglas Booth, who played Pip in the BBC’s recent adaptation of ‘Great Expectations’.

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Hamlet

 22nd October Cineworld Cardiff

National Theatre Production (2010)

Rory Kinnear takes the title role in Nicholas Hytner’s chilling modern production of Shakespeare’s great tragedy. Hamlet (Rory Kinnear), the Prince of Denmark, is haunted by the ghost of his murdered father. Consumed by grief, he vows revenge upon the man he holds responsible. That’s his uncle Claudius (Patrick Malahide), who went on to claim both the throne and Hamlet’s mother, Gertrude (Clare Higgins). ‘Hamlet’ is one of the Bard’s most frequently staged plays. But National Theatre Director Nicholas Hytner’s 2010 modern-dress production offered a dynamic new interpretation, giving the play a bold psychological and political context. His Elsinore is a tyrannical police state where every move is subject to surveillance. Olivier Award-winning actor Rory Kinnear took the role of Hamlet to great acclaim. The Times described his performance as “superb in its resonance and intelligence”. This HD broadcast returns to Cineworld as part of the National Theatre’s 50th anniversary celebrations.

Find out more here.

(with thanks to Ceri Sullivan for alerting me to these screenings)

Shakespeare Institute Library

Info on Shakespeare, Renaissance literature and other useful library and research stuff.

GEMS

Group for Early Modern Studies

annesophierefskou

Anne Sophie Refskou

We Are Cardiff

A blog about Cardiff, its people, and the alternative arts and cultural scene!

cityawakenings

Cities. Culture. Regeneration. PhD Musings.

Lets pay more tax

Elspeth Jajdelska

Dr Johann Gregory

An Early Career Academic with special expertise in English Literature & emerging expertise in Creative Economy

Dr Alun Withey

Welcome to my blog! I am an academic historian of medicine and the body, and 2014 AHRC/BBC 'New Generation Thinker'. Please enjoy and let me know what you think.

Thinking in Arden

Blog posts, mainly Shakespearean

The 18th-Century Common

A Public Humanities Website for Enthusiasts of 18th-Century Studies

ESTS

The European Society for Textual Scholarship

the many-headed monster

the history of 'the unruly sort of clowns' and other early modern peculiarities

MOUTH

Edia Connole & Scott Wilson