h1

April 19, 2012

Originally posted on CEMS:

Shakespeare’s All’s Well that Ends Well has long been classed as a ‘problem play’, uneven in tone and jarring in plot resolution. What if part of the ‘problem’ stems from collaboration? In an article just published in the Times Literary Supplement, Laurie Maguire and Emma Smith have advanced a bold new theory about the play’s authorship. You can find a footnoted version on the CEMS website which you can access here.

View original

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

the many-headed monster

the history of 'the unruly sort of clowns' and other early modern peculiarities

MOUTH

Edia Connole & Scott Wilson

Show & Tell

The one where I tell you my thoughts about the plays I see

Sheffield's Shakespeare

An inclusive community reading group

Historians for History

Informed discussion of Britain's historical relationship with her European neighbours

Literature and Philosophy 1500-1700

University of Sussex, 14th-16th July 2015

sophiecoulombeau

Reading writing. Writing reading.

James Loxley's Digital Footprint

Made in Scotland, from data

Rhys Tranter

Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts

Manicule

☛ Thoughts on the Eighteenth Century, Daniel Defoe, and Digital Humanities

digitalhumanistbeginner

Thoughts on eighteenth-century literature and digital technology

Thomas Middleton’s A Game at Chess (1624).

A symposium and script-in-hand performance of the play

CRECS//

Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century Seminar

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS)

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS)

Shakespeare in the City

A blog celebrating Shakespeare Education & Performance in NYC

sage bites

Reflections on quotations for life

Pre-modern Perspectives

A blog about medieval and renaissance literature and modern culture.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 293 other followers

%d bloggers like this: