Archive for May, 2010

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Shakespeare’s Philosophy

May 28, 2010

Richard Wilson will be speaking at a special seminar today on Shakespeare and Philosophy at Royal Holloway, University of London. The title of his paper is The Hideous Rashness: Shakespeare and the decision.

“The aim of the seminar is to provide a forum in which to debate the validity and value of treating Shakespeare as a philosopher or his plays as forms of philosophical thought, and of bringing philosophical perspectives, past or present, to bear on his plays and poetry.”

Organised by Margherita Pascucci with the support of the European Community Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship.

To find out more (with audio) about the seminar click here.

Chair:  Professor Kiernan Ryan (Royal Holloway)

Speakers:

  • Professor Catherine Belsey (Swansea University);
  • Dr Ewan Fernie (Royal Holloway);
  • Professor John Joughin (University of Central Lancashire);
  • Dr Simon Palfrey (Brasenose College, Oxford);
  • Professor Kiernan Ryan (Royal Holloway);
  • Professor Richard Wilson (Cardiff University).

Respondents:

  • Professor Andrew Bowie (Royal Holloway);
  • Professor Martin Dzelzainis (Royal Holloway);
  • Professor Robert Eaglestone (Royal Holloway);
  • Dr John Miles (Royal Holloway);
  • Dr Andy Mousley (De Montfort University);
  • Dr Margherita Pascucci (Royal Holloway).

Participants:

  • Dr Roy Booth (Royal Holloway);
  • Dr Christie Carson (Royal Holloway);
  • Gabi Cooke (Royal Holloway);
  • Dr Neil Gascoigne (Royal Holloway);
  • Paul Hamilton (Royal Holloway);
  • Professor Robert Hampson (Royal Holloway);
  • Charlotte Keys (Royal Holloway);
  • Dr William McKenzie (Royal Holloway);
  • Susan Sachon (Royal Holloway);
  • Mohamed Salim-Said (Royal Holloway);
  • Helen True (Royal Holloway);
  • Rebecca Warren-Heys (Royal Holloway).
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Henry VIII at The Globe

May 27, 2010

Henry VII is now showing at The Globe. Read a review here.

Bringing down the house

“Today Henry VIII is most famous as the play which burnt down the original Globe theatre on the afternoon of 29 June 1613. Wadding from a stage cannon ignited the thatched roof and the theatre burned to the ground ‘all in less than two hours, the people having enough to do to save themselves’. The story goes that the only casualty was a young boy’s trousers which caught fire, only for a friendly neighbour to extinguish the flames with his bottle of beer.
This production will be the play’s premiere at the rebuilt Globe on Bankside.” The Globe Website

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The Pantaloons: Macbeth

May 24, 2010

If Macbeth at The Barbican, or Macbeth at The Globe wasn’t enough, you can witness more of the Scottish play performed by The Pantaloons this summer.

“The Pantaloons draw from a wide variety of popular theatre traditions, from commedia dell’arte and pantomime to stand-up comedy and silent movies, to bring what we consider to be a vital sense of “play” back to Shakespearean performance.” See their website here.

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Early Modern Literary Studies

May 23, 2010

R. M. Christofides, who recently completed his PhD at Cardiff University, has an article published in the latest issue (15.1) of the journal, Early Modern Literary Studies. The article is called Iago and Equivocation: The Seduction and Damnation of Othello. In the same issue, Joseph Sterrett, also formerly of Cardiff University, reviews Regina Schwartz. Sacramental Poetics at the Dawn of Secularism: When God Left the World. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2008. EMLS is an online peer-reviewed journal which is open access.

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Literary Theory Lectures Online

May 21, 2010

Literary Theory: Yale Video Course

Paul H Fry

Yale

These lectures can be viewed via youtube here or by clicking on the individual lecture titles below.

“This is a survey of the main trends in twentieth-century literary theory. Lectures will provide background for the readings and explicate them where appropriate, while attempting to develop a coherent overall context that incorporates philosophical and social perspectives on the recurrent questions: what is literature, how is it produced, how can it be understood, and what is its purpose?”

Course Index

  1. Introduction to Literary Theory
  2. Introduction to Literary Theory (cont.)
  3. Ways In and Out of the Hermeneutic Circle
  4. Configurative Reading
  5. The Idea of the Autonomous Artwork
  6. The New Criticism and Other Western Formalisms
  7. Russian Formalism
  8. Semiotics and Structuralism
  9. Linguistics and Literature
  10. Deconstruction I
  11. Deconstruction II
  12. Freud and Fiction
  13. Jacques Lacan in Theory
  14. The Postmodern Psyche
  15. The Social Permeability of Reader and Text
  16. The Frankfurt School of Critical Theory
  17. The Political Unconscious
  18. The New Historicism
  19. The Classical Feminist Tradition
  20. African-American Criticism
  21. Post-Colonial Criticism
  22. Queer Theory and Gender Performativity
  23. The Institutional Construction of Literary Study
  24. Neo-Pragmatism
  25. Reflections

Course information and documents can be found here.

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Unknown Texts Conference: Sorbonne Nouvelle

May 19, 2010

Richard Wilson from Cardiff University will be taking part in a one-day conference at the Sorbonne Nouvelle  in Paris this weekend.

He will be responding to papers by Roger Chartier (on Cardenio) and Peter Stallybrass (on Hamlet). Francois Laroque will then chair a round table discussion.

Roger Chartier gave the humanities annual lecture at Cardiff University this academic year, while Francois Laroque gave a paper as part of the lecture series, MEMORI.

For more about the conference see below:

Unknown Texts Poster

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Troilus and Cressida Workshop in Berlin

May 11, 2010

Performing the Poetics of Passion: Troilus & Cressida / Troilus & Criseyde

Richard Wilson and Johann Gregory from Cardiff University will be attending an international workshop in Berlin tomorrow. It is hosted by the special research cluster ‘Languages of Emotion’ at the Freie Universität Berlin and is sponsored by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft).

Richard Wilson will be presenting a paper entitled:

‘Like an Olympian wrestling’: The Pause in Troilus and Cressida

Other medieval and Renaissance scholars speaking during the three day workshop include: Kathrin Bethke, Ute Berns, John Drakakis, Wolfram Keller, Hester Lees-Jeffries, Robert Meyer-Lee, Andreas Mahler, James Simpson, Stephanie Trigg, Paul Strohm, David Wallace, Kai Wiegandt.


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